Santiago High School's Student News Site

Shark Attack

Santiago High School's Student News Site

Shark Attack

Santiago High School's Student News Site

Shark Attack

Making History
Making History
Heidi Barden, Staff Writer • February 26, 2024
Should Santiago Advertise More Sports?
Should Santiago Advertise More Sports?
Caitlyn Wilson, Treasurer and Publicist • February 26, 2024
Baseball Season is Here!
Baseball Season is Here!
Hannah Heintz, Editor • February 26, 2024
Leclerc and Hamilton Ferrari 2025
What You’ve Missed This Winter Break- F1
Joanna Cruz, Staff Writer • February 26, 2024
Is this the end of Tunnel Girl?
Is this the end of Tunnel Girl?
Johana Lopez, Staff Writer • February 26, 2024
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The Ebony Alert

The+Ebony+Alert

In a time where social issues and government pushback take center stage, the Ebony
Alert Law stands as a significant piece of law formulation aimed at addressing a critical issue in
our society. While many of you are probably familiar with the Amber Alert system for missing
children, the Ebony Alert law is supposed to be the government’s way of trying to highlight and
draw more attention to the black community’s missing children and women, but what they are
doing is causing a divide by allowing the police departments to know what race a child is
before they decide which protocol route they want to take.

Origins of the Ebony Alert Law
The Ebony Alert law initially known as the “Black but Not Forgotten Act,” was introduced in
Congress in 2020 by Representative Cedric Richmond and Senator Kamala Harris. Originally, the
law was named to honor Tamika Hudson, a young African-American woman who went missing
in Spartanburg, South Carolina, in 2004. The tragedy of her disappearance did not receive the
same level of media attention and resources as many other missing person cases. This further
shows that if Tamika could not get the attention and awareness on the amber alert, what
difference is the Ebony Alert going to make? All this does is highlight the flaws and corruption our
system has. On October 8th, 2023, California Governor Gavin Newsome officially signed SB 673.

The new law will create an emergency alert system to “help” find missing black youth and
women between the ages of 12 and 25. Supposedly, this alert works by enabling California
Highway Patrol to activate the new ebony alert upon request from local law enforcement when a
“black youth” or “young black woman” is reported missing under unexplained or suspicious
circumstances or has been abducted.

The beginning of a separation
If the amber alert already existed in an already divided world, what is the need to create a law
that further separates the balance of society? What sickens me the most is the two laws
have the same meaning, but they tarnish the effect when they throw a label on it, especially an offensive and insensitive one at that. Now, although I agree that knowing
ethnicity/race is essential when it comes to locating a child, I also believe that it is not
necessary to create a whole other separate alert that boldly tells what type of search is to be
placed for the child.

The point of an amber alert is to be announced to ask for the public’s help
in finding abducted children, so if the goal at the end of the day is to find a missing child, that is
what the focus should be on not finding another way for our children to be pushed on a back
burner.
Time to stand up
Don’t let the backstory or approach distract you from the real motive and agenda the
government is trying to push. Although I agree with the awareness of missing African-American
children should be raised; this is not the way to do it. The only way real change will
happen is by supporting and standing for our community and receiving the same support from all communities.

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About the Contributor
Kristen Hazely, Staff Writer
Kristen Hazely (12) is a current senior at santiago high school and Also 1 of the captain’s of Santiago’s hip hop team. She plans to attend her dream hbcu next fall where she plans to major in sports medicine or journalism. She likes to spend her spare time reading and listening to music. Being a senior and her first year apart of the school’s paper, Kristen is hoping to strengthen her skills as a writer because journalism is something she has always been interested in but never pursued.  When Kristen is not busy running practices and coming up with routines, she enjoys spending time with her family or just relaxing while watching old rom-coms.n the future, she hopes to excel in her journalism career and become a sports newscaster or work for one of her favorite magazines Essence which she hopes will lead to her writing a best seller and hosting her own talk show. You can reach her at [email protected]
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